Posts Tagged ‘ferrari’

Poverty or Simplicity?

June 28, 2010

The current “recession” or economic downturn has prompted many people to enjoy a healthier, greener, ecologically responsible, and simpler lifestyle.  So what is the difference between poverty and simplicity?

If I’m angry that I can’t afford a new Ferrari I may feel that I’ve been doomed to poverty.  However, if I enjoy the classic lines and character of a 20-year old sports car that I can easily afford, then it appears I have chosen simplicity.  If I “can’t afford” to eat at Ruth’s Chris I may begrudge the government’s tax and economic policies.  If Joanne and I invite some friends over for a potluck dinner where our contribution comes from our neighbor’s left-over cucumbers and tomatoes, our peace of mind may originate from our choice for simplicity.

John Robbins turned down his family’s Baskin-Robbins ice cream fortune in order to “live a far more simple and earth-friendly life.” He and his wife built a tiny one-room log cabin on an island off the coast of British Columbia, where they grow most of their own food.  John says, “This isn’t about deprivation.  It’s about choice and self-determination.”

The dictionary defines “poverty” as – “The state of being poor; lack of the means of providing material needs or comforts.”  The definition of simplicity is – “the absence of luxury, pretentiousness, ornament, etc.”

Could it be that whether we live in “poverty” or “simplicity” is primarily a choice of how we view our situation?  Simplicity has many rewards that go beyond saving money.    Among those may be the experience of living well.

One of my favorite authors, Henry David Thoreau once said: “For my greatest skill has been to want but little.” In Walden he expands on his choice to live simply:  “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life…”

If you’re in challenging financial times, don’t miss the opportunity to suck out all the marrow of life.  When good times return you are likely to find that your giving goes to 20 or 30% while your simplicity remains the same.

Just Gimme a Little More Time!

July 14, 2009

In the first few moments of the movie Collateral, the taxi driver, played by Jamie Foxx, tells Tom Cruise’s character: “I’m not in this for the long haul.  This is just filling in—I’m putting some things together—I’m going to open my own limo service.” Cruise asks him, “How long you been doing this?” To which the taxi driver replies, “Twelve years.”

This is a classic example of how life happens.  I once saw a client who had taken a temporary job at a bank. He knew that wasn’t where he wanted to be; it was just a fill-in job while he did his real job search. That was fourteen years ago. Life just happened; he got used to where he was and didn’t take enough initiative to move on to a higher level of success.

Here is a step-by-step process for change (with example clarifications):

1. Clarify your current situation.

  • I have been in the same job for twelve years with no change in sight.
  • I detest the monotony of my job.

2. Seek the advice and opinions of other people.

  • I will ask four or five trusted friends or professionals what they would do if they were in my situation.
  • I will ask the members of my Sunday School class what they would advise.

3. Identify the alternatives.

  • I could go back to school and get a degree in education.
  • I could create a clear focus and do a job search with a company with some advancement potential.
  • I could start my own chauffeuring service.
  • I could request a manager’s position with my current company.

4. Choose the best alternative.

  • I will start my own chauffeuring service.

5. Act.

  • I will create my business plan in the next thirty days, give my two weeks’ notice fifteen days after that, aggressively plan to purchase my own vehicle by that time, and be open for business sixty days from now.

ferrari1

Whether it’s choosing a new school, a new place to live, a new car, or a retirement center for a parent, you must keep a clear deadline in view.  Otherwise, procrastination will lead to indecision.

The point is this: Don’t wait on perfect conditions for success to happen; just go ahead and do something.

Okay the Ferrari limo — that may be just my dream, but anything’s possible

Network Marketing — Good or Bad?

November 7, 2008

A reader recently asked, “Dan, what do you think of the concept of network marketing if the product is great and the training is exceptional?”

Well let me ask you this.  If I told you the new Ferrari 612 Scaglietti has exceptional safety features, rollover ratings, great re-sale value, above average fuel efficiency and sells for only $312,088 – would you run out and buy one?   Obviously there are other considerations, such as your driving interests and financial position, as there are in this reader’s question.  The primary issue is not is it a great company, with a great product and exceptional training – but rather, is the business model itself a “fit” for you?

If you are a natural cheerleader, always breaking the silence in the elevator, schmoozing at parties, inviting 40 friends over for a good time, and won first prize in your college debate class then you are probably a candidate for network marketing.  On the other hand, if you are reticent and shy, preferring to work with ideas rather than people and you get nauseous at the idea of standing up as a first time visitor in a new church, then this business model would be a total flop for you.  It doesn’t matter how great the products and the training are – it’s not a match.

You may be somewhere in between these two extremes, but the critical issue always is to choose a business model that “fits” what you already know about yourself.  Incidentally, I hope it’s a “fit” for you to grab this new Ferrari. ferrari-612


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